pineapple parasol

exploring art, life, and varying forms of beauty

39 notes

chaplinfortheages:

pathos-in-pantomime:

Another one of Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin

"More than machinery, we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness." —Charlie Chaplin


This has to be reblogged every chance I get. On the set of “Sunnyside” 1919
One of the most touching photos I have ever seen of him, beautiful the way she is able to understand him, putting her fingers to his lips and thumb on his throat to feel the vibrations.
A book by Helen Keller “Midstream my Later Life” from 1929. She describes meeting Charlie and her impression of him. Very sweethttp://archive.org/stream/midstreammylater017614mbp#page/n231/mode/2up/search/charlie+chaplin

chaplinfortheages:

pathos-in-pantomime:

Another one of Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin

"More than machinery, we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness." —Charlie Chaplin

This has to be reblogged every chance I get. On the set of “Sunnyside” 1919

One of the most touching photos I have ever seen of him, beautiful the way she is able to understand him, putting her fingers to his lips and thumb on his throat to feel the vibrations.

A book by Helen Keller “Midstream my Later Life” from 1929. She describes meeting Charlie and her impression of him. Very sweet
http://archive.org/stream/midstreammylater017614mbp#page/n231/mode/2up/search/charlie+chaplin

138 notes

chaplinfortheages:

Watching “The Gold Rush” - I am always mesmerized by this scene.
The music he used - Tchaikovsky’s Sleeping Beauty Waltz just beautiful.

I can never say enough how beautifully he framed this shot, looks like the tramp is looking through a window. In a room full of people he seems to be the loneliest soul in the world

chaplinfortheages:

Watching “The Gold Rush” - I am always mesmerized by this scene.

The music he used - Tchaikovsky’s Sleeping Beauty Waltz just beautiful.

I can never say enough how beautifully he framed this shot, looks like the tramp is looking through a window. In a room full of people he seems to be the loneliest soul in the world

320 notes

philamuseum:

Today is Alexander Calder’s birthday. Known for his hanging mobile sculptures, he was born in nearby Lawnton, PA. His father and grandfather were also sculptors whose work is featured prominently in our city. In fact, Alexander’s grandfather Alexander Milne Calder made the William Penn statue on top of City Hall. You can see the youngest Calder’s “Ghost" in the Museum’s Great Stair Hall, hanging from the ceiling. Here’s wishing him a happy birthday.Great Stair Hall, including “Ghost" (foreground), 1964, by Alexander Calder (© Estate of Alexander Calder / Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York)

philamuseum:

Today is Alexander Calder’s birthday. Known for his hanging mobile sculptures, he was born in nearby Lawnton, PA. His father and grandfather were also sculptors whose work is featured prominently in our city. In fact, Alexander’s grandfather Alexander Milne Calder made the William Penn statue on top of City Hall. You can see the youngest Calder’s “Ghost" in the Museum’s Great Stair Hall, hanging from the ceiling. Here’s wishing him a happy birthday.

Great Stair Hall, including “Ghost" (foreground), 1964, by Alexander Calder (© Estate of Alexander Calder / Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York)

(via spencerkate)

8 notes

Earlier this year, I began to work on a series of some of my most personal pieces yet.  First, let’s cut to the chase with the story that gives them both context:

When I was a child, I was a very happy, quirky, innocent little child, without a care in the world.  I was also definitely what you would call a daddy’s girl.  I absolutely, sweetly, hugely, loved and adored my dad, and everyone could see it.  Just about every day, I, almost obsessively, drew him pictures, to the point where he told me he would soon no longer have room for all the things I made him.  On one sunny day, when I was seven years old, while I was happily playing a game, my dad called me to come sit next to him on our green leather couch, and then told me he was leaving us.  Infinitely perplexed and shocked by what I was hearing, the confirmation of the reality of this moment came when I asked him if he was going to come back.  That was when I heard the worst “no” I’ve heard so far in my little life experience.  My childhood and innocence, as I once knew them, were over.  In the years after that, though I was still so young, I continually tried to distance myself from childhood; anything at all that made me feel childlike again.  In my mind, it was time to move on and grow up, or, as I so sadly said at age eight, “to be treated like I’m a teenager.”


The first piece, as you’ll see above, deals directly with that dark moment on the green leather couch.  Using leather from that actual set of couches, I recreated a likeness of that couch on top of my drawing of that event, and turned it into a sort of trash can, as that couch, as someone brilliantly suggested to me, was like the trash can where my childhood, my innocence, myself, was thrown away by my father.  In the trash can itself are recreations of things I drew as a child, including things I clearly recall drawing specifically for my dad.  The process of creating that piece, I must say, was very emotionally trying.  To be honest, I would find myself breaking down into tears every hour or two when the memory of that moment would come back to vividly haunt me, making me feel like that seven-year-old girl all over again, heartbroken from rejection, wondering why I wasn’t enough to make him stay.  However, these tears over painful memories kept on turning into tears of joy and gratitude, as I had, purely by coincidence, not considering how the lyrical themes connected to my piece, been playing the music of the wonderful musician Jason Gray on repeat; music of sweet hope and redemption in the midst of pain and darkness.  As something new is literally being created from a symbol of my past pain, I hear the words being sung, “You love me as I am, not as I should be,” “Even this will be made beautiful,” and "In the hands of our redeemer, nothing is wasted."  Hearing these things while doing what I was doing created such a beautiful contrast.  (Check out Jason’s album Love Will Have The Final Word)

Now comes the piece that covers redemption.  It was one year after my dad left that the first of the Lord of the Rings movies, The Fellowship of the Ring, released, before which one of my sisters had begun reading the Lord of the Rings books to me.  The Lord of the Rings turned out to be an unexpected sweetness and presentation of hope to me and my family in the throes of that trial, and while most children eagerly wait all year to find presents under the tree at Christmas, I, like the awesome little geek that I was, waited for the next Lord of the Rings movie.  If I could summarize The Lord of the Rings very briefly, I would say it’s a story of perseverance, redemption, and hope.  Something has been destroyed and darkened, and now a journey must take place to restore it.  The journey will be rough, rocky, and plenty painful, but along the way are glimpses, great and small, of the hope that is being sought after, and at the end of it all, that hope will be found, and all will be redeemed.  It was for those reasons that I have identified so much with the stories of Middle Earth.

This second piece was also made on that green couch leather, but this time, the thing that not only represents ugliness, but is rather ugly itself, is covered with something beautiful, illustrating the journey of the fellowship, and myself, from darkness and desolation, to hope, redemption, and beauty.  The images are made from Lord of the Rings memorabilia; cut up pieces of many, many paper photo stills of the movies from a page-a-day calendar.  The images on this piece are meant to depict places traveled in Middle Earth; from bottom to top - the Ash Mountains (surrounding Mordor), the Forest of Mirkwood, the Shire, and then, finally, the way to the Grey Havens, where all is well and at peace.  Now, this is where I get in full-on geek mode - the order of images is very loosely based on the illustrated geography of Middle Earth.

To conclude, I want to say that I am aware that my story is not the worst one out there.  So many people, those I know and do not know, have been through things far more tragic than I have, but my hope is to remind those who have walked through darkness, to whatever degree that may be, that they are not alone, and are free to address their pain and story.  Also, I want to say that I love my father.  I truly do.  Just as my story was not and is not over, his story isn’t over yet, either, and I want him to know the same hope and redemption that I have experienced.

Filed under my art art papercutting lord of the rings collage leather trash drawing pen and ink couch childhood drawings childhood rejection redemption hope

3 notes

Christ is more of an artist than the artists - he works in living spirit and flesh, he makes men instead of statues…
Vincent van Gogh

30,173 notes

Anonymous asked: "It's a metaphor" I have no doubt that you completely understand and stand by this statement that the act of putting an unlit cigarette in Augustus Waters' mouth is in fact a metaphor. But for some folks, we don't see it asa metaphor, we see it as situational irony, or a simple statement. Please explain how it is a metaphor.

fishingboatproceeds:

Well, a character in a novel saying that something is a metaphor is not the same thing as the author of the novel saying that it’s a metaphor. Gus’s intellectual grasp often exceeds his reach (he calls a monologue a soliloquy, and misuses quite a few of the bigger words in his vocabulary). But I do think the cigarette is a metaphor, albeit a different one for us than it is for him.

Gus’s idea is that the cigarette is a metaphor for illness, and he keeps it unlit and in his mouth as an expression of his power over illness. “You put the killing thing between your teeth but you don’t give it the power to do its killing.” Gus’s thinking here is that HE has the power. This is why he tends to use the cigarette when he’s feeling nervous or powerless. (He’s also using the most famous commercially available carcinogen to make this statement, so obviously there’s a connection there in his mind: Humans can prevent cancer by not smoking; cancer is something we can have power over; your job is not to give cancer the power to kill you; etc.) 

But of course Gus is wrong about all of this, or at least almost all of it. You may have SOME control over whether you die of cancer (you can choose not to smoke), but in most cases humans don’t have control over illness. “You don’t give it the power to do its killing” imagines more agency over illness than we actually have, because in the end much of the fault is in the stars, not in ourselves. So to us, the unlit cigarette is a metaphor for our false perception of control, and our urgent need to feel in control. It’s no coincidence, then, that when Gus’s life is spiraling out of control and he finds himself powerless before fate, he tries (and fails) to buy cigarettes.

122 notes

jameshance:

Star Wars.

You know. You think about it, and it’s good. You’re used to it - It’s just there. You forget about what it does to you a little bit, because it’s always just there. You almost take it for granted. It’s like your shoes - You know where they are, and you don’t think twice about slipping them on when you leave the house. Shoes. Star Wars is shoes.

But now and again you stick that movie on, and the theme hits and those credits crawl and those stars stretch from here to the very core of your childhood. It’s still magic. It’s just magic.

That’s all it is.

x

62 notes

robinmayfleming:

From our friends at Driftwood Visual:

"we were invited to document the nuptials of our dear friends (via instagram!) robinmay and matthewjay, during the spring of 2013. here’s their story. it is beautiful."

This is our wedding video. xx.

I believe I’ve been following Robin on Instagram for nearly the entire time I’ve been a part of it, and following her brought on such a pleasant surprise of inspiration and encouragement from the captions of a wonderful Canadian stranger, teaching me to be willing to think deeply and be vulnerable, and showing me that I’m not alone in the vulnerability of life.  Having watched her and Matt’s story unfold in real time on Instagram was such an exciting and beautiful thing to witness from afar, and to finally get to see and hear them live it out in this video made me feel a little weepy inside.  Forever happy for them!